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Thursday, 9 June 2016

My comprehension assessment task.

Complete both texts and write the answers in your own words.
TASK 1 - read the text about Sneakairs

TEXT: EasyJet's Smart "Sneakairs" Makes Sightseeing Effortless

What I already know about navigating with maps?
  • They help you for were you want to go so you don't have to use A paper map the shoes are A smarter way for were you want to go.
  • these shoes are very smart.
Who created “Senakairs?”?
lechal made these smart shoes.
How do the “Sneakairs” work?
  • There is a tiny arduino clone a bluetooth module and a vibration motor that are encased which is in a plastic box and is placed beneath the soles to make the sneakairs work also this is a ordinary shoe to make it be a easyjet smart sneakair all you have to do is get the easyjet smartphone app once you have reach were you want to go the easyjet smart sneakairs will vibrate three times meaning it is telling you you are there and then it will go back to a ordinary shoes until you use the app again.

How do “Sneakairs” help tourists visiting a new city or town?
  • It helps you so you don't have to look at A map.
  • It tells you when you get there.
What challenge does easyJet need to overcome before “Sneakairs” can go mainstream?
  • They need to get others to buy a few of the shoes so the shoes will spread round the place then lots of audlts and kids will buy them and then the shoes will become a big thing and to make this a big thing they could put ads on tv.
Can you think of any other uses for smart shoes like Sneakairs? - (give at least 2)
    • if you could you could run with them and they might be able to tell you how long you have ran for
Can you think of a better invention than Sneakairs to help us navigate places? Why is that invention better than Sneakairs?
  • It could be good if you did't have to have A app because you don't no if you have to buy the app and if you do have to buy it it could be lots of money maybe.


TASK 2: The purpose of this task is to identify details that support a main idea.
A main idea that the author David Hill often explores is: New Zealand's natural environment, and how awesome (impressive and amazing) and powerful it can be.
Read the following passages from pages 7, 8 and 9 of "The Sleeper Wakes" by David Hill.
a) Find details in the text that support this main idea. Underline these details.
b) Think about what the 'sleeper' is, and how it would 'wake' up. Highlight details in the text that suggest this development.
Two girls stood with their parents by a car, watching him. So Corey tried to look cool and expert, and he started up the track behind his father.
The blunt pyramid of Mt Taranaki lifted into a blue winter sky. softened the cliffs Snowwhere lava had flowed, thousands of years ago. High up towards the summit, the ridge of The Lizard showed where more lava had crawled downwards before cooling and setting.
Corey lowered his gaze to the 4WD track twisting up the and green trees rose on eastflag north-nk. Pamountain's cked grey either side. After just ten metres, all sounds from the carpark faded away. Only the crunch of their boots broke the silence.
Three steps ahead, his Dad walked steadily. He wore a woollen hat and green Gortex jacket to keep out the June cold. Warwick Lockyer, Department of Conservation Field Officer; expert on Mt Taranaki; tramper and climber.
His father loved this n. mountain He loved its silences and stories, the way it tested people. Corey felt the same way. Being up here was the greatest feeling in the world. Pity some other people couldn't see it that way.
* * *
After 30 minutes' climbing, they paused, took deep breaths, and gazed around. The trees were lower. Tangled, waist-high shrubs had taken over, crammed together for shelter, tops flattened by the wind. In summer, white and yellow flowers blazed here, flowers that grew nowhere else in the world. Now everything huddled beneath winter snow.`
Far below, the towns glinted like little grey models – New Plymouth, Inglewood, Stratford. Off to the left, the Tasman Sea was a sheet of grey steel.
On the horizon, blue-and-white shapes shouldered upwards: the peaks of Ruapehu, Ngauruhoe, Tongariro. Corey thought of Riki, the other DoC Field Officer. From Riki, he'd heard how Mt Taranaki once stood beside those other volcanoes, fought with them for the love of beautiful Mt Pihanga, then marched away in anger after losing the fight. Hardly any Maori people lived along the line between Ruapehu and Mt Taranaki; they believe that one day, Taranaki would head back in the fire and smoke to find his love again.
Corey stood listening to the silence. A puff of wind slid past. A pebble, loosened by the morning sun probably, dropped from an icy bank nearby.
'Awesome day,' Corey said.
His father nodded. 'Pity Dean couldn't make it.'
Corey glanced up at the dazzling white summit. Dean was a volcanologist who monitored New Zealand's North Island volcanoes to see if any eruptions seemed likely. He came to visit two or three times a year, even though nothing ever happened on Mt Taranaki.
Corey's father was gazing upwards, too. He stretched, and grinned at his son. 'Come on, mate. We're sleepier than this mountain.'